Ubuntu Travels

CHUCK MCKEEVER'S TUMBLR

fishingboatproceeds:

I don’t really understand how that is a question up for discussion on television news. I mean, even putting aside the gajillion ways that white people are privileged by, for instance, being able to think that whiteness is “normal,” studying world history from Eurocentric perspectives,  and etc etc:

- White people are less likely to be arrested for the same crime than black people, and black people serve longer (much longer!) sentences than white people.

- Marijuana use is similar among black and white populations in the U.S., but young African Americans are more than THREE TIMES more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession or use than white Americans. 

- Racial bias in hiring in the U.S. is well-documented and persistent.

- African American students are far more likely to be punished in schools, even though they are not much more likely to break school rules than their white peers.

- Even after accounting for reasons like education disparity, geographical distribution, and occupation, there is a persistent wage gap: White people make are paid more than African Americans due to racial discrimination. 

- White people in the U.S. on average have lower mortgage rates than African Americans.

White privilege is a fact of every facet of American life. I realize I’m mostly preaching to the choir here, but this is not a political issue or a subject for debate. It is well-documented and irrefutable.

Like most others, I was a seeker, a mover, a malcontent, and at times a stupid hell-raiser. I was never idle long enough to do much thinking, but I felt somehow that some of us were making real progress, that we had taken an honest road, and that the best of us would inevitably make it over the top. At the same time, I shared a dark suspicion that the life we were leading was a lost cause, that we were all actors, kidding ourselves along on a senseless odyssey. It was the tension between these two poles - a restless idealism on one hand and a sense of impending doom on the other - that kept me going.
Hunter S. Thompson, The Rum Diary (via fy-perspectives)

(via literatureismyutopia)

When male singers co-opt songs written by women and don’t change the lyrics to make them heteronormative 🙌🙌🙌

http://www.last.fm/music/Seamus+Kennedy/Live/I+Wish+I+Had+Someone+to+Love+Me

Reading Hemingway’s “The Last Good Country” at the family farm in Chemung County, NY

Asker Anonymous Asks:
what about Gaza and Ferguson John? do they not deserve your respect? you're such a hypocrite, i's disgusting
ubuntutravels ubuntutravels Said:

fishingboatproceeds:

I think this is a deeply flawed way of looking at the world.

Now, I have talked about Ferguson, and I’ve talked about Gaza. (In fact, I’ve been writing and talking about Israel and Palestine for more than a decade.) But there are many important problems facing the world that I haven’t talked about: I haven’t talked much about the civil war in South Sudan, or the epidemic of suicide among American military personnel, or the persecution of Muslim Rohingya people in Myanmar.

Is that okay? Is it okay for me to talk about, say, racism in football and lowering infant mortality in Ethiopia? Or must we all agree to discuss only  whatever is currently the ascendant news story? Is it disrespectful to Ferguson protesters to talk about continued political oppression in Egypt now that we are no longer reblogging images of the protests in Tahrir Square? I think this is a false choice: If you are talking about Ferguson and I am talking about Ethiopian health care, neither of us is hurting the other.

I think the challenge for activists and philanthropists online is in paying sustained attention, not over days or weeks but over years and decades. And I worry that when we turn our attention constantly from one outrage to another we end up not investing the time and work to facilitate actual change. We say “THE WORLD IS WATCHING,” and it is…until it isn’t. We’ve seen this again and again in Gaza and the West Bank. We’re seeing it in Iran. We’re seeing it in South Sudan. And we’re seeing it in the U.S., from net neutrality to Katrina recovery.

The truth is, these problems are complicated, and when the outrage passes we’re left with big and tangled and nuanced problems. I feel that too often that’s when we stop paying attention, because it gets really hard and there’s always a shiny new problem somewhere else that’s merely outrageous. I hope you’re paying attention to Ferguson in five years, anon, and I hope I am, too. I also hope I’m paying attention to child death in Ethiopia. I don’t think these things are mutually exclusive.

I really don’t want to minimize the effectiveness of online activism, because I know that it works: To use a personal example, I’ve learned a TON from the LGBT+ and sexual assault survivor communities in recent years online. People on tumblr make fun of me for apologizing all the time, but I apologize all the time because I am learning all the time, and every day I’m like, “Oh, man, Current Me has realized that Previous Me was so wrong about this!”

But we can only learn when we can listen. And when you call me a hypocrite for talking about X instead of talking about Y, it makes it really hard to listen.

At times, online discourse to me feels like we just sit in a circle screaming at each other until people get their feelings hurt and withdraw from the conversation, which leaves us with ever-smaller echo chambers, until finally we’re left only with those who entirely agree with us. I don’t think that’s how the overall worldwide level of suck gets decreased.

I might be wrong, of course. I often am. But I think we have to find ways to embrace nuance and complexity online. It’s hard—very, very hard—to make the most generous, most accepting, most forgiving assumptions about others. But I also really do think it’s the best way forward.


The Student by Richard Picolo.


Pretty sure this is just the dude from “Office Space”

The Student by Richard Picolo.

Pretty sure this is just the dude from “Office Space”

(via literatureismyutopia)

dukeofbookingham:

This is too accurate.

If it were at all practical to tattoo this entire strip on myself, I would.

(via literatureismyutopia)

Despite their occasional transgressions against their father’s only inviolable law, the Pipeta children got along with him well enough. They craved guidance and stability from this man enamored of all things fragile and had to be satisfied with what little of it they received. They knew no other source of it—only Peter had any real memory of their late mother, and even that only came in faint murmurings in the deep recesses of his mind, triggered by sights and smells whose connections had long ago been shorn of their bearings. For what child makes a conscious effort to remember and preserve those things dearest to him? It is the ultimate blessing and curse of happy childhoods that, while in them, we are so convinced of the permanence of all those people and things we love that we make no effort to hold them just a little closer, breathing them so deeply that to forget them would be an impossibility. It is only as we grow older that we begin to cling to the past, to was and were, and more often than not find shadow instead of substance.
"The Butterfly House", my third-string writing project (via ubuntutravels)

austinkleon:

Cory Arcangel’s, Working On My Novel

theparisreview:

“It’s the story of what it means to live in a cultural climate that stifles almost every creative impulse, and why it so often seems we should stop trying.”

Dan Piepenbring on Cory Arcangel’s new book, Working on My Novel, a compilation of tweets from people who are putatively at work on novels.

I heard about this idea on Twitter and thought it was stupid, but then I saw images of the book and sort of loved it. (Kind of amazing that Penguin actually published something so minimal and artsy fartsy?) Also this Saul Bellow quote in the post:

I wonder whether there will ever be enough tranquility under modern circumstances to allow our contemporary Wordsworth to recollect anything. I feel that art has something to do with the achievement of stillness in the midst of chaos. A stillness that characterizes prayer, too, and the eye of the storm. I think that art has something to do with an arrest of attention in the midst of distraction. —Saul Bellow, the Art of Fiction No. 37, 1966

"Yeah I’m a writer deal with it." lololol. The Saul Bellow quote is fantastic though. 

I believe that Collins’ construction of Rue as the symbol of innocence meant that some readers automatically imagined her as White. After all, in what universe is an older Black tween innocent? Certainly not in American schools, with the often noted discipline gap. Certainly not in contemporary children’s literature, where Black kids and teens are underrepresented… and when they do appear, are sometimes viewed as “unlikeable” or “unrelatable.”

Collins also makes the grave mistake of stating from Katniss’ point of view that Rue reminds her of her younger sister, Prim. Prim is a much more familiar figure in children’s literature — the guileless, golden girl child often is the counterweight that balances the evil that the protagonist must overcome, and The Hunger Games is no exception. What is different is that while trapped in the Game, Rue becomes Katniss’ Prim, a younger companion who shares in the existential threat until she is overcome by it.

This was too much for some readers to take.
"Why is Rue a Little Black Girl?" - The Problem of Innocence in the Dark Fantastic by Ebony Elizabeth Thomas (The Dark Fantastic)  (via diversityinya)

My favorite response to this was a tweet that said, “If people are upset about some Hunger Games characters not being white, wait til they find out about Jesus.”

(via kaylapocalypse)